Eye Spy Home Inspection - We know homes -- inside and out.
 
Radon - What You Need to Know
 
 
 
What the EPA says about Radon, and what homeowners, home buyers and sellers need to know.
The EPA has determined that 1 in 15 homes has unsafe levels of Radon. 
 
Is Your Home One of them?
 
The bad news about Radon is that it poses significant health risks -- it is the most frequent cause of lung cancer, after smoking. 
 
The good news is that homes with elevated Radon levels CAN BE FIXED -- and pretty inexpensively.
 
Take a few minutes here to find out what you need to know about Radon and how it affects your home or a home you are buying. 
 
Click on the image at left to read the EPA's booklet online
 

How Does Radon Get Into Your Home?
 
Radon is a radioactive gas. It comes from the natural decay of uranium that is found in nearly all soils. It typically moves up through the ground to the air above and into your home through cracks and other holes in the foundation. Your home traps radon inside, where it can build up. Any home may have a radon problem. This means new and old homes, well-sealed and drafty homes, and homes with or without basements.
 
Radon from soil gas is the main cause of radon problems. Sometimes radon enters the home through well water (see "Radon in Water" below). In a small number of homes, the building materials can give off radon, too. However, building materials rarely cause radon problems by themselves.
How Radon gets into a home
 
 
RADON GETS IN THROUGH:
  1. Cracks in solid floors
  2. Construction joints
  3. Cracks in walls
  4. Gaps in suspended floors
  5. Gaps around service pipes
  6. Cavities inside walls
  7. The water supply
 
 
 
 
Buttton about radon testing
 
 
EPA's Radon Mapping System
You'll see on the maps below that the EPA rating for the York County, SC and Mecklenburg, NC areas are Zone 2.  This means they have moderate potential for unhealthy levels of indoor radon. 
 
 
 
South Carolina Counties
EPA Radon Map of SC. Where higher levels of Radon are commonly found in SC.
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
North Carolina Counties
 
EPA Radon Map of NC. Where higher levels of Radon are commonly found in NC.
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
COLOR CODING
 
Zone 1 (red zone) counties have a predicted average indoor radon screening level greater than 4 pCi/L (picocuries per liter)  Highest Potential

Zone 2 (orange zone) counties have a predicted average indoor radon screening level between 2 and 4 pCi/L Moderate Potential
 
Zone 3 (yellow zone) counties have a predicted average indoor radon screening level less than 2 pCi/L Low Potential
 
 


Find out about Eye Spy Carolina Home Inspections Radon testing HERE
 
 
 
If you have questions, or would like to schedule a Radon Test for your home, please give us a call  803.548.0500
or contact us by EMAIL.